Monday, January 16, 2012

REVIEW: The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus

A very difficult book to read it never the less was interesting in some aspects. The style of writing is very fluid and I find myself enjoying the way the author integrated both questions and his own thoughts in a way that has me thinking a great deal. This is one of the few books which does not have me not wanting to finish due to it being written in second person. Instead the work is in a way speaking with me on the subject and yet not lecturing either. It is rather strange, and yet it does bring a great deal of thinking, the way that Camus has statements throughout the book that are ended by question marks. It is almost as though he is questioning both himself and the reader. The same is true for the times that he ends his questions with periods as though he does not want an answer but merely wishes to have the question stated.
The distinction being made between logic and emotions is one that is familiar to me, by way of Star Trek. The distinction is constant throughout the Original Series as Dr. McCoy and Mr. Spock and their continuous spats about the virtues of logic as opposed to emotions.
Much of what Camus speaks of is immediately applicable to real life and as such allows me to understand to a greater extent that which he desires to communicate to his readers. Furthermore the shifts of topic flow so smoothly that at times I am hardly aware of the change.

The style of writing is very fluid and I find myself enjoying the way the author integrated both questions and his own thoughts in a way that has me thinking a great deal.  This is one of the few books which does not have me not wanting to finish due to it being written in second person.  Instead the work is in a way speaking with me on the subject and yet not lecturing either.  It is rather strange, and yet it does bring a great deal of thinking, the way that Camus has statements throughout the book that are ended by question marks.  It is almost as though he is questioning both himself and the reader.  The same is true for the times that he ends his questions with periods as though he does not want an answer but merely wishes to have the question stated.
The distinction being made between logic and emotions is one that is familiar to me, by way of Star Trek.  The distinction is constant throughout the Original Series as Dr. McCoy and Mr. Spock and their continuous spats about the virtues of logic as opposed to emotions. 
Much of what Camus speaks of is immediately applicable to real life and as such allows me to understand to a greater extent that which he desires to communicate to his readers.  Furthermore the shifts of topic flow so smoothly that at times I am hardly aware of the change.
The later half of the Myths of Sisyphus Camus delves into the subjectivity in relation to personal life choices and view of the world.  The idea that anyone can have and aspect of their life which they devote themselves to and find fulfillment in.   Any individual can find an aspect or as the case of Don Juan in a specific emotion.  Don Juan's life fulfillment is to be in love at all moments of his life.  It does not matter that the love is not specific to one individual but rather he feels that he allows his partners to experience love at least once in their life.
Concerning the section on conquest:
It is said that actions speak louder than words but how does one judge actions? One can only judge one's self by their own standards; whether or not these standards fit with those of the society.  What can you judge them against? Any one person can judge another by only two criteria. They can judge the person by their own standards and by the standards set by their society.   In the context of conquest, where does action stand in relation to thought? Thoughts are in my opinion far more important as thoughts can be twisted to allow any action to be the most logical or even the best in the long run no matter how strange or terrible the action in question is.

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